Top Ten First Hamburger Myths – The State of Greater Western New York Report – May 5, 2022

May is National Burger Month and you know what that means: You will be seeing tons of stories about hamburgers, their origin, and where the first hamburger was sold. Chances are, at least one or two so-called “facts” in those articles will be wrong. Which ones? Click the video below and you will learn the top ten myths concerning the origin of the hamburg sandwich.

In the first segment of the show, Hamburger History Expert Christopher Carosa counts down the first five myths ranging from obviously false origin claims to how the first hamburger was served. Carosa explains how old newspaper archives were instrumental in revealing the truth to counter these myths. Among these stories includes a McDonald’s publicity stunt that backfired. You’ll be amazed how Ray Kroc turned that lemon into lemonade and got his much sought-after publicity.

In the second half of our show, the Carosa counts down the final five hamburger origin myths. You’ll find out what they were first called and why the cheeseburger wasn’t invented in Southern California during the 1920s as claimed. Finally, the top myth shows you why the hamburger wasn’t really “invented” in the traditional “R&D” manner.

Our guest happily answered questions from the live audience. In fact, these are probably some of the same questions you had. Would you like to be a member of our live audience so you can ask our guests questions? Click here to join the growing number of members who share your feelings on StateOf.GreaterWesternNewYork.com because then we can automatically send you the link to watch our shows live.

Are you interested in a more detailed read on these top ten myths? Click here and read “Top Ten Myths About The Origin of the Hamburger.”

Do you want to learn more about the true history of the hamburger? Click here to buy and read Hamburger Dreams: How Classic Crime Solving Techniques Helped Crack the Case of America’s Greatest Culinary Mystery.

Theme music by mansardian courtesy of FreeSound.org under Creative Commons License Attribution 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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